Evaluation of Long Term No-till Effects on Soil Fertility

The adoption of no-till seeding systems in western Canada has been driven by a variety of factors, moisture conservation and economic efficiency likely the major ones. This project was conducted to evaluate whether or not the conversion of fields to no-till has been shown to increase soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, as well as increasing soil water use efficiency by crops.

IPNI-2003-CAN-SK36

The adoption of no-till seeding systems in western Canada has been driven by a variety of factors, moisture conservation and economic efficiency likely the major ones. Read more


Year of initiation:2003
Year of completion:2005
Map:

Interpretive Summary

Evaluation of Long Term No-Till Effects on Soil Fertility, 2005 The adoption of no-till seeding systems in western Canada has been driven by a variety of factors, with moisture conservation and economic efficiency being the major ones. The conversion of fields to no-till has been shown to increase soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as water use efficiency by crops. Together, these factors lead to increased productive potential of the soil.

Evaluation of Long-Term No-Till Effects on Soil Fertility, 2004. The adoption of no-till seeding systems in western Canada has been driven by a variety of factors, with moisture conservation and economic efficiency the major ones. The conversion of fields to no-till has been shown to increase soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as water use efficiency by crops. Together, these factorslead to increased productive potential of the soil.

Evaluation of Long-Term No-Till Effects on Soil Fertility, 2003. The adoption of no-till seeding systems in western Canada has been driven by a variety of factors, with moisture conservation and economic efficiency the major ones. The conversion of fields to no-till has been shown to increase soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as water use efficiency by crops. Together, these factors lead to increased productive potential of the soil.

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Updates & Reports

2004

2004 Annual Report

2003

Project Description

2003

Methodology

2003

Justification

2003

Investigators

2003

Objectives


Project Leader

Guy Lafond, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada


Project Cooperators

Jim Halford


IPNI Staff

Adrian Johnston


Location

Americas \ Northern America \ CAN \ Saskatchewan


Topics

4r place, 4r time, nutrient management, soil fertility and productivity

barley, field pea, lentil, rapeseed (canola), wheat

Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Sulfur (S)