Reseach and Implementation Program for the 3rd Phase of the HarvestZinc Project

IPNI-2008-GBL-10

The HarvestZinc Fertilizer Project has been developed under HarvestPlus Program (harvestplus. org) and was first started on April 2008. This project seeks to explore and test fertilizer use to improve the Zn concentration of various staple food crops, particularly wheat and rice. Used in concert with breeding approach, the application of Zn fertilizers to soil and/or foliar further encourages and ensures plants to produce Zn dense seed and also contributes to yield. Read more


Year of initiation:2008
Year of completion:?
Map:

Interpretive Summary

Phase 3 of the HarvestZinc project is now complete.

The 3rd Phase of the HarvestZinc project has been underway for a year and is organized under four tasks. Task-1: Determine the response of newly developed high zinc (Zn) lines from the HarvestPlus breeding program to soil and foliar spray of Zn and other micronutrients—field trials are underway in India (rice) and Pakistan (wheat). In addition to soil and foliar-applied Zn, micronutrient cocktail solutions containing Zn, iodine (I), selenium (Se), and iron (Fe) are being evaluated.

The third phase of the HarvestZinc project started in January, 2015. The major tasks of Phase 3 are: (1) determine the response of newly developed high Zn lines from the HarvestPlus breeding program to soil and foliar spray of Zn and other micronutrients. Field experiments have been started in Pakistan with wheat and in India with wheat and rice.

2014 marked the end of the second phase of the project studying the effect of Zn fertilization on crops in different countries. Turkey, China, India, Pakistan, and Zambia are conducting wheat experiments, while rice experiments are being carried out in China, Thailand and India. Brazil is working with common beans and Zambia is initiating sorghum experiments, in addition to wheat.

The HarvestZinc Fertilizer Project began in 2008 to explore and test fertilizer use to improve the zinc (Zn) concentration of staple food crops. Biofortification of cereal grains through Zn fertilization compliments plant breeding efforts in alleviating Zn deficiency in crops and related problems in human nutrition. Results of the first phase of the project were reported in Better Crops/Vol 96 (2012) No. 2.

Zinc deficiency is a global nutritional problem in crops and humans in many countries. Application of Zn-containing fertilizers offers a rapid solution to the problem complementing genetic solutions via plant breeding. This project was initiated in 2008 to evaluate the potential of various Zn-containing fertilizers to increase Zn concentration in cereal grains and improve crop production in various countries.

Zinc deficiency is a global nutritional problem in crops and humans in many countries. Application of Zn-containing fertilizers offers a rapid solution to the problem complementing genetic solutions via plant breeding. This project was initiated in 2008 to evaluate the potential of various Zn-containing fertilizers to increase Zn concentration in cereal grains and improve crop production in various countries.

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Updates & Reports

2018

HarvestZinc Project Phase 3 - Executive Summary

2015

HarvestZinc Project Annual Report

2010

Published Reports Related to the Research

2008

Project Description

2008

3rd Phase Proposal - 2016


Publications

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HarvestPlus Zinc Fertilizer Project: HarvestZinc Ismail Cakmak
Better Crops With Plant Food
2012-2, page #17
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Overcoming Human Zinc Deficiencies with Proper Fertilization Zinc (Zn) deficiency in human diets causes people to have many health complications, including impaired brain development, weakened immune systems, and stunted growth. Zinc deficiency is responsible for the deaths of 450,000 children annually. Low Zn intake is clearly a major issue, especially among women, children, and the elderly living in the developing world.
Research with Impact

Project Leader

Ismail Cakmak, Sabanci University


Project Cooperators

BRAZIL: Agência Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegócios
CHINA: China Agricultural University
INDIA: Punjab Agricultural University
MOZAMBIQUE: Instituto de Investigacao Agraria de Mocambique
PAKISTAN: Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission
THAILAND: Chiang Mai University
TURKEY: Ministry of Agriculture
ZIMBABWE: University of Zimbabwe
SOFESCA: Soil Fertility Consortium for Southern Africa


IPNI Staff

T. L. Roberts


Location

Asia \ Western Asia \ TUR


Topics

yield

maize, rice, wheat

Zinc (Zn)