Nitrogen Management and Water Productivity of Limited Irrigation Corn

This project seeks to improve crop water productivity of irrigated maize by better understanding the interaction of nitrogen fertility management and limited irrigation.

IPNI-2013-USA-UT9

Objective: This project seeks to improve crop water productivity of irrigated maize by better understanding the interaction of nitrogen fertility management and limited irrigation. Background: Water scarcity is one of the most pressing contemporary challenges for agricultural and food sustainability. In many arid and semi-arid regions of the world, irrigation has been developed to allow stable, high yield agriculture and avoid the effects of drought. Read more


Year of initiation:2013
Year of completion:2015

Interpretive Summary

2015

Many maize-growing regions are chronically plagued with limited soil moisture as a result of erratic rainfall or inconsistent access to irrigation water. The available soil moisture influences how nutrients are taken up by plants and how they are utilized for metabolism. In this two-part research, the water status of greenhouse-grown maize was measured using remote sensing of the crop canopy temperature.

2014

In arid areas around the world, water scarcity threatens agricultural and food sustainability. Water scarcity is driven by increasing competition for a limited water supply, drought and declining groundwater resources. One coping strategy is timing irrigation and N fertilization with plant growth stage. The project uses field and greenhouse studies to evaluate the interaction of N fertility status and limited irrigation for maize. Results of the greenhouse study are reported here.


Updates & Reports

2013

Project Description


Project Leader

Neil Hansen, Brigham Young University


Project Cooperators

None


IPNI Staff

R. Mikkelsen


Location

Americas \ Northern America \ USA \ Utah


Topics

irrigation, water

maize

Nitrogen (N)