Seed Row Tolerance of 16-20-0-13 and 12-40-0-6.5S-1Zn in Western Canada

IPNI-2015-CAN-AB35

The main emphasis of the experiments are to assess the seed row tolerance of spring wheat and canola, to the two of Simplots fertilizer products, both are dry granular compound fertilizers, i. e. · ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulfate, analysis 16-20-0-13S, and · ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulfate and zinc sulfate, analysis 12-40-0-6. Read more


Year of initiation:2015
Year of completion:?
Map:

Interpretive Summary

The majority of phosphorus (P)-based fertilizers are either applied directly in the seed furrow (seed row) or side banded close to the seed row, for the growing of small grain cereals, canola, and lentils in the western Prairie Provinces of Canada. Improved crop genetics have resulted in increased crop yield potentials, and accompanying increased removals of P in harvested grain.

The majority of phosphorus (P)-based fertilizers are either applied directly in the seed furrow (seed row), or side-banded close to the seed row for the growing of small grain cereals and canola in the Western Prairie provinces of Canada. This research study is assessing the effect of low and elevated rates of 16-20-0-13S compared to other P fertilizers available in the market. The fertilizer treatments were seed-row placed in experiments of both spring wheat and canola.

The majority of P-based fertilizers are either applied directly in the seed furrow (seed row), or side-banded close to the seed row for the growing of small grain cereals and canola in the Western Prairie provinces of Canada. Farmers using ammonium phosphate-sulfate (16-20-0-13S) fertilizer have reported that they can safely apply greater amounts of phosphate in the form of 16-20-0-13S in the seed row compared to monoammonium phosphate (11-52-0).

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Updates & Reports

2015

Project Description


Project Leader

Bill Hamman, Hamman AG Research


Project Cooperators

None


IPNI Staff

T. Jensen


Location

Americas \ Northern America \ CAN \ Alberta


Topics

canola, wheat

Nitrogen (N)